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Telehealth or In-person Therapy Sessions: Which Is Right for Me?

Telehealth options have significantly expanded during the coronavirus pandemic. Although COVID-19 forced many people to switch to telehealth therapy sessions for a while, some have chosen to return to traditional, in-person appointments with their therapists. Depending on your schedule, personality and goals for therapy, you may find that you prefer one over the other. If […]

Telehealth options have significantly expanded during the coronavirus pandemic. Although COVID-19 forced many people to switch to telehealth therapy sessions for a while, some have chosen to return to traditional, in-person appointments with their therapists. Depending on your schedule, personality and goals for therapy, you may find that you prefer one over the other. If you’re new to therapy, it can be daunting to decide whether telehealth sessions or in-person therapy is right for you. Each option provides its own benefits, so it’s important to consider which will best meet your needs and lifestyle.

In-Person Therapy

Telehealth or In-person Therapy Sessions: Which Is Right for Me

Meeting and getting to know someone face-to-face helps to build trust, which is a cornerstone of any therapeutic relationship. That’s not to say that trust can’t be formed in teletherapy sessions – some people just need the in-person experience to build a rapport with their therapist. Clients who have been going to therapy for a while may also consider the time they spend visiting their therapist part of their routine and an important aspect of self-care. Some people find it easier to shut out distractions and focus when they’re in their therapist’s office. Others don’t want to be bothered with technological issues that could affect their sessions. Regardless of your reasons, if you’re comfortable with sitting in your therapist’s office and feel that you get more out of in-person sessions, it’s probably the best option for you.

Telehealth Therapy Sessions

Telethealth is a convenient, flexible way to attend therapy sessions. It is great for those who can’t leave their homes or live in remote areas where access to mental health treatment is limited. It can also help people who are hesitant to try therapy because of the stigma that may be attached to it. Being able to talk to someone while at home can help them feel safe and secure, and to reassure them that their privacy is protected.

Teletherapy is also a good option if you have a hectic schedule, as you don’t have to spend time traveling to and from your therapist’s office. You can do teletherapy from almost anywhere, whether you’re on a lunch break at work or you schedule an appointment during your child’s naptime. If you’re on vacation or out of town for business, a telehealth appointment enables you to talk with your therapist.

Choose What’s Right for You

You can also choose to do a combination of teletherapy and in-person sessions. This can be especially beneficial for children, especially since many of them are at home doing distance learning. You may want to take your child for an in-person assessment with a therapist and then continue with ongoing telehealth sessions.

Each person’s individual needs are different. You may need to try both types of therapy to decide which one is right for you. Just keep in mind that no matter which one you choose, therapy can help put you on a path to emotional growth, healing and joy.

 

Schedule Telehealth or In-person Therapy at Kayenta

Kayenta Therapy offers both in-office therapy and telehealth services. Contact a therapist directly to get started.

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Close Quarters, Technology & Your Mental Health + How Therapy Can Help

Spending time with your family can bring great joy and strengthen your connections, but during the COVID-19 pandemic, families have been confined together for months, which can put a strain on relationships. In addition, parents and children are using technology like social media, video games, the internet, and other digital diversions to entertain and distract […]

Spending time with your family can bring great joy and strengthen your connections, but during the COVID-19 pandemic, families have been confined together for months, which can put a strain on relationships. In addition, parents and children are using technology like social media, video games, the internet, and other digital diversions to entertain and distract themselves, which isn’t always healthy. Seeking therapy can help you understand how these circumstances can impact your mental health and allow you to learn coping tools that can improve the quality of life for everyone in your household.

Challenges of Being at Home

Close Quarters, Technology & Your Mental Health + How Therapy Can Help

Some parents and children are now using their homes as spaces for work and school, which are major interruptions to how a household may have operated in the past. The stress of dealing with these changes can lead to more conflict and escalation of arguments. It’s important to check in with each other often to see what’s working and what isn’t and talk about possible solutions for the issues you may be experiencing.

During these tough times, it’s more important than ever for home to be a safe place for everyone. The way you and your partner treat each other has a huge impact on your kids’ mental health and well-being. If you or other members of your household are struggling, individual counseling or family therapy can help you learn how to cope with stress and conflict in positive ways.

How the Use of Technology Is Impacting Families

Although technology is a useful tool that allows you to work, go to school and communicate with others remotely, too much of it can be detrimental to your overall well-being. With all that’s going on in the world today, consuming too much media can cause anxiety, depression, and skew your worldview to the negative. Social media has also become a place that can be hostile. When you find yourself mindlessly scrolling through social media or playing a game for hours, it’s probably best to shut off your device and leave it alone for a few hours.

Children often use video games to tune out and blow off steam, which is fine in limited amounts. However, limiting your child’s screen time (and your own) every day can help improve their mental health and allow them to better concentrate on things like schoolwork. For as much as technology may connect you with others, spending too much time wrapped up in it can actually create division and make you feel isolated. Getting outside for even an hour a day can allow all of you to release pent-up energy and find solace in the healing of nature. Other activities such as creating art, reading, crafting, and other hobbies can also improve mood and give everyone a break from technology.

Ways to Cope that Therapy Can Provide

If you find yourself getting annoyed or irritated with your spouse or children, it’s okay to take some time for yourself by taking a walk or a drive or shutting yourself away with a good book for a while. When conflict arises, take a few deep breaths before reacting, and remember that emotions may be running high for everyone. Setting expectations about chores, work and school, and sticking to a routine, can also help make things easier. Being kind to yourself and others can help you all learn how to share the spaces in your home. If you need to vent, call a trusted friend or consider seeking therapy. Don’t forget to have fun with game nights, creative projects or outdoor activities.

In-person therapy sessions or teletherapy can help you cope and stay resilient during these uncertain times. For more information or to make an appointment, contact a therapist at Kayenta today.

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Therapy in Las Vegas & These Actions Can Calm Your Child’s Anxiety About Getting Back into a School Routine

Most kids have anxiety about going back to school at one time or another. Change is hard and returning to school during a pandemic is unchartered territory for students and parents. Helping your child cope with anxiety about getting back to a school routine can help make the transition easier and let them know hey […]

Most kids have anxiety about going back to school at one time or another. Change is hard and returning to school during a pandemic is unchartered territory for students and parents. Helping your child cope with anxiety about getting back to a school routine can help make the transition easier and let them know hey can count on you for support. If your child is experiencing anxiety that’s affecting their ability to function, finding therapy in Las Vegas can help them manage their feelings and feel more secure.

Ways to Help Ease Your Child’s Anxiety

Stay Calm & Share Your Feelings

Schedule Therapy in Las Vegas with a Kayenta Therapist

It’s important to stay calm, but sharing your own thoughts in a productive way can encourage your kids to open up about how they feel. Saying something like, “I’m going back to work and wondering about what it will be like makes me a little nervous. I know you might feel apprehensive about school, too. Some things will be very different, like wearing a mask and practicing social distancing. How do you feel about that?” Acknowledging your child’s feelings is also critical. Let them know you understand that school can be hard, especially if they’re virtually learning, but it will get easier and more fun.

Talk About Staying Healthy, not Getting Sick

If your child is worried about catching the virus, it’s vital to discuss their fears in a way that won’t exacerbate their anxiety. Let them know this won’t last forever, but for now, everyone has to do their part to keep themselves and others healthy. Talk about ways to stay well, like maintaining a balanced diet, getting plenty of sleep, wearing a mask, washing your hands frequently, and practicing social distancing at school and in other public places.

Practice at Home

If you know the safety protocols your child’s school is following, practicing them at home can help them get an idea of what to expect at school. For example, wearing a mask while watching TV together, doing art projects or playing a board game with the whole family will help your kids get comfortable with wearing a mask when it’s time to go to school. You can even turn it into a game. If you meet up with friends for a play date, ask the kids to see who can wear their mask the longest, and give them a reward.

Find Therapy in Las Vegas

If your child is having trouble sleeping, experiencing stomachaches, throwing tantrums, or withdrawing from others and activities they enjoy, it’s a good idea to seek therapy in Las Vegas with a counselor who can help them learn the skills they need to cope in these trying times. Kayenta Therapy offers teletherapy and in-person sessions. Contact a therapist at Kayenta directly to schedule an appointment.

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How Teletherapy Can Help Children with Special Needs During COVID-19

Due to the coronavirus, most schools, businesses and mental health facilities have been closed for months. For children with special needs, disruptions in their schedule can seriously affect their progress and take a toll on the whole family. Teletherapy is just one way many families are helping their children get the assistance they need. Ways […]

Due to the coronavirus, most schools, businesses and mental health facilities have been closed for months. For children with special needs, disruptions in their schedule can seriously affect their progress and take a toll on the whole family. Teletherapy is just one way many families are helping their children get the assistance they need.

Ways Teletherapy Can Help Your Special Needs Child

It Provides Support for Parents & Caregivers

Therapists who provide counseling for children with special needs are working closely with parents, educators and other professionals, such as speech therapists, occupational therapists and others. Although it may take a while for kids to get used to sessions via teletherapy, the benefits it provides are worth it. Many parents and caregivers have had to step into the roles of therapist and teacher. Teletherapy helps them engage with their children and learn new strategies for adhering to their child’s therapy plan and IEP during this challenging time.

Teletherapy Provides Consistency & Continuity

Schedule a Teletherapy Appointment with One of Our Therapists Today

For children with conditions like autism, consistency is critical to keep them on track emotionally, behaviorally, socially, and academically. Teletherapy can prevent regression and help children with special needs keep progressing and learning new skills. For example, if a child has been learning coping and communication techniques through Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), it’s important for them to see their therapist regularly. Even though they’re at home, teletherapy can help them keep developing their communication, social, life, and learning skills.

It Can Help with Anxiety

Children with special needs often experience anxiety when their regular schedules and activities are thrown out of whack. They may not understand why they can’t go to school, see friends or visit their therapist. Seeing a therapist remotely can help to assuage their fears and help parents understand how to help their children deal with anxiety.

It Can Keep Families from Feeling Isolated

Many families with special needs kids struggle to connect with others and get the help they need. One benefit of teletherapy is that it can allow children in more rural areas to get treatment more conveniently and frequently. Children who are adept at using computers and other technology may also respond better to teletherapy, as they feel more comfortable communicating through a screen than face-to-face.

Learn More About Teletherapy for Special Needs Kids

Teletherapy can help your child and family stay connected and provides much-needed support during these unpredictable times. For more information or to make an appointment, contact a therapist at Kayenta today.

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Understanding Anxiety in Children

In these uncertain times anxiety is more common than ever, especially in children. When your child is anxious, your first instinct may be to protect them from their fears, but it’s important to help kids learn how to cope with anxiety on their own. In addition to taking your child to see a therapist, there […]

In these uncertain times anxiety is more common than ever, especially in children. When your child is anxious, your first instinct may be to protect them from their fears, but it’s important to help kids learn how to cope with anxiety on their own. In addition to taking your child to see a therapist, there are things you can do to help your child minimize anxiety by encouraging them to use positive coping mechanisms.

Signs of Anxiety

Some signs of anxiety in children include avoiding activities they used to enjoy and inability to relax or concentrate. Depending on their age, your child may get clingy and want to be with you all the time. During the COVID-19 pandemic, many children who have never experienced anxiety before may be wondering when they’ll see their friends again, what school will look like in the fall and whether or not they or someone they love may become sick. Children often don’t understand where intense worries or feelings are coming from and how to deal with them. That’s why it’s vital to pay attention to your child’s behaviors and feelings – if you notice that they’re more anxious than usual, there are things you can do to help them feel more secure.

How to Help Your Child

Therapy Can Help Ease Your Child’s Anxiety

Stay calm when your child becomes anxious – It’s okay to let your child experience some anxiety about an upcoming event or transition. Let your child know that everyone feels this way sometimes, especially when trying something new.

Help them build on their strengths – Praising your child for even the littlest accomplishments helps build their confidence and self-esteem, which can help them deal with anxiety when it arises. When they face a challenge, try something new or overcome their fears, let them know you’re proud of them. Encourage them to explore their interests, whether it’s art, music, sports, or something else. Giving the jobs around the house and praising them for contributing to the family can also make them feel secure and competent.

Maintain a normal routine – Sticking to a routine can help assuage a child’s anxiety because they know what to expect, but it’s important to be flexible as when necessary. It can be challenging to stay on track, especially if your child is doing distance learning while you’re trying to work from home. Take it easy on yourself but try to stay on a schedule.

Plan for transitions – Many children have a tough time with transitions such as moving, starting school, dealing with divorce and other events that can be life-changing. Ease your child into transitions by talking with them about it beforehand, listening to what they have to say and answering any questions they may have. Reassure them that no matter what happens, you’ll be there for them.

Seek therapy – All kids experience anxiety at one time or another, but when a child’s fears begin to interfere with their ability to function it may be time to seek therapy.

If your child is experiencing anxiety, our experienced, compassionate child therapists can help them learn skills that can help them cope during these challenging times. Contact a therapist at Kayenta directly to get started.

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Child Therapy in Las Vegas Can Help Children Transition Back into School

Getting back into the groove of going to school can be challenging in the best of times. During the coronavirus pandemic, easing into the school year may seem overwhelming for both parents and kids. With so much uncertainty surrounding different areas of life, children may feel anxious or unsure about what to expect after the […]

Schedule Child Therapy in Las Vegas by Contacting a Therapist at Kayenta Today

Getting back into the groove of going to school can be challenging in the best of times. During the coronavirus pandemic, easing into the school year may seem overwhelming for both parents and kids. With so much uncertainty surrounding different areas of life, children may feel anxious or unsure about what to expect after the first week of school, so it’s important to keep an eye on their mental health and overall well-being. If your child is having a difficult time coping, child therapy in Las Vegas can help them understand their feelings and how to deal with them. Whether your child has physically returned to school or is participating in distance learning, aiding them with the transition can help them get off to a good start. 

Change Sleep Schedules Gradually
Going from the lazy days of summer to the more regimented schedule of the school year can be hard on everyone, especially if you’re not getting enough sleep. If your kids stay up later and enjoy leisurely mornings in the summer, it’s vital to begin pushing back bedtimes. Getting your family’s sleep schedule back on track can lead to less chaos and put everyone in a better mood in the mornings. Regardless of your child’s age, start moving bedtime by 20 – 30 minutes each night. Adolescents and teenagers need plenty of sleep, too. 

If you’ve fallen out of them over the summer, get back into rituals like reading books or taking a bath before bed. Turn off all screens at least an hour or two before hitting the hay. The light from the TV, smartphone, computer, or tablet stimulates the brain, making it harder to wind down and fall asleep. This is a good idea for the adults in the house, too. 

Follow a Schedule
It’s easy to be lax with regular wake-up and mealtimes during the summer. If you’re homeschooling this school year, start waking your kids up at the same time every day and setting regular times for breakfast, snacks, lunch, and dinner. In addition, making the day more structured can help your kids ease into the rigid schedule of school. For example, do arts or crafts projects at 10 am, have lunch and clean up, then maybe have an hour of quiet time in which they read or nap. Preparing meals and snacks together and providing organized activities for your kids can help make the transition into the school year run more smoothly. If your child hasn’t seen their friends in a while, making (socially distant) play dates before the school year begins can help them reconnect as well. 

Contact Their Teachers
If your child is distance learning, stay in regular contact with your child’s teacher to ensure your child is learning valuable lessons essential for their personal growth. Ask what you can do as a parent to help you child prepare for the rest of the school year. If your child is having a hard time, make sure to let their teachers know so you can discuss ways you can all help to make things easier.

Find Child Therapy in Las Vegas

If your child is resistant or overly anxious about getting back into a school routine, seeing a child therapist in Las Vegas can help. Kayenta Therapy offers in-office and teletherapy services to clients of all ages. To get started, contact a therapist at Kayenta today.

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How to Handle a Call from the School Counselor

In these uncertain times, children and adults alike are struggling with the lasting effects of COVID-19. Being isolated from friends and doing schoolwork from home can leave children feeling lonely, depressed or anxious. When children return to school in the fall, it’s a good idea to prepare for what may be around the bend once […]

How to Handle a Call from the School Counselor

In these uncertain times, children and adults alike are struggling with the lasting effects of COVID-19. Being isolated from friends and doing schoolwork from home can leave children feeling lonely, depressed or anxious. When children return to school in the fall, it’s a good idea to prepare for what may be around the bend once school begins. Some children have more trouble with transitions than others, so don’t be surprised if your child’s school counselor gives you a call to check in. 

Why Would A School Counselor Call A Parent?

When a school counselor contacts a parent, the parent may go into panic mode, wondering what type of problems their child may be having or thinking about what the child may have done to warrant the call. It’s important to keep in mind school counselors call parents for many different reasons. In these challenging times, they may be even more observant and conscientious about helping children cope with what’s happening. Whether a counselor contacts you about your child’s social development, academic concerns or personal issues, just remember they most likely have your child’s best interests in mind. 

Talking with Your Child’s School Counselor

The best thing you can do when your child’s school counselor contacts you is to listen to what they have to say. Ask questions to find out what’s happening at school (or cyber-school) that prompted the call.  The counselor may ask you if there is anything going on at home that could be affecting your child’s academic performance or behavior. They may also inquire about whether your child has spoken to you about any problems or issues they’ve encountered, both in and outside of school. Regardless of what the issue may be, if your child is struggling, the school counselor may recommend you schedule a session with a child therapist in Las Vegas. Some common reasons a counselor may suggest outside help include:

  • Evaluation, medication or testing for behavioral issues or learning disabilities
  • Your child becomes overly emotional and can’t calm down in school
  • The counselor feels your child needs specific, individualized treatment
  • An external issue seems to be affecting your child’s behavior and learning
  • Your child has harmed or has attempted to harm themselves or others at school

Finding Help for Your Child

Although the school counselor may provide resources for therapy, as a parent, you make the final decision about choosing your child’s therapist. Viewing it as an opportunity to help your child before any issues escalate can help you keep things in perspective. Your child may also feel more comfortable seeing a counselor outside of school for privacy reasons.  

Contacting a Child Therapist

Kayenta Therapy has provided a safe space for many independent, licensed child therapists to practice for 15 years. These therapists can help your child deal with any challenges they may be facing and help them learn effective coping skills that can make them feel happier and more secure in these uncertain times. Contact a therapist at Kayenta directly to get your child started on the road to further their success.

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How Therapy Can Ease Your Anxiety About Going Out Post COVID-19

Now that many places are open for business, people who have been at home for months due to COVID-19 are carefully venturing out. For some, the thought of dining out at a restaurant, catching a movie, traveling or even going to the grocery store brings up feelings of anxiety and fear. These feelings are normal […]

A Therapist at Kayenta Can Help You Cope with Anxiety About Post-Quarantine Activities

Now that many places are open for business, people who have been at home for months due to COVID-19 are carefully venturing out. For some, the thought of dining out at a restaurant, catching a movie, traveling or even going to the grocery store brings up feelings of anxiety and fear. These feelings are normal in such uncertain times, but when they start to interfere with your day-to-day life, it may be time to seek help from a therapist

How Do I Know If I Need Help?

Emerging from an experience like quarantine can be daunting and overwhelming. You may be anxious about catching or spreading COVID-19, or maybe you’re afraid you’ve lost social skills. It’s important to remember you’re not alone – many people feel this way and are concerned about navigating this new world. 

Fear is a natural part of the human experience. In fact, a small amount of it can keep you safe –it may inspire you to follow public health guidelines, such as wearing a mask and social distancing. Self-care practices, like daily exercise, mindfulness and doing things you enjoy, can help, but sometimes aren’t enough to conquer anxiety and fear. Therapy provides the opportunity to speak confidentially to a professional about how you’re feeling. Not only that, teletherapy is now more accessible than ever, so if you don’t feel ready for an in-person therapy session, you can connect from the comfort of your home. 

How a Therapist Can Help

Fears about resuming public life may be magnified after spending months indoors, but talking about it with a therapist and learning how to manage fear and anxiety can help. Therapy can help you figure out why you feel the way you do and help you learn how to change the thoughts and actions that contribute to fear and anxiety. A good client-therapist relationship is built on trust, and a compassionate, collaborative counselor can make you feel heard and understood.  A therapist can help you learn to identify and manage the triggers that contribute to your anxiety about going out post COVID-19. 

When you understand how your own thoughts contribute to feelings of fear and anxiety, they may become easier to manage. Practicing these skills when faced with the prospect of traveling or going out in public can help you effectively approach your fear with curiosity and quell anxiety. Changing thoughts and behaviors takes time, honesty and hard work, but you may find that you’re feeling better after just a few therapy sessions. Everyone is different, and each therapist takes a personalized approach, depending on their client’s needs. 

Schedule a Therapy Session

Therapists at Kayenta are dedicated to providing a safe space to help you develop tools for growth, peace and happiness. Contact a therapist directly to schedule a teletherapy session.

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Manage Mental Health with Help from Teletherapy During the COVID-19 Crisis

People around the globe are feeling anxious and overwhelmed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Some also feel frustrated and powerless living in such a time of uncertainty, and the constraints of social distancing have left many feeling isolated as well. Although it’s normal to feel this way, it’s important to take care of yourself and your […]

Schedule Teletherapy by Contacting One of Our Therapists Directly

People around the globe are feeling anxious and overwhelmed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Some also feel frustrated and powerless living in such a time of uncertainty, and the constraints of social distancing have left many feeling isolated as well. Although it’s normal to feel this way, it’s important to take care of yourself and your mental health during these trying times. From seeking teletherapy to scheduling virtual gatherings with loved ones, many people are adapting and finding new, creative ways to manage their mental health. These tips can help you cope and may even spur ideas for new things to do that you’ll enjoy for years to come.

Take Care of Your Physical Health
A balanced diet and plenty of exercise can help keep you feeling good during this tough period. Social distancing doesn’t mean you can’t go outside – taking a walk or just sitting outdoors and soaking up the sunshine for 30 minutes a day can lift your spirits and provides a vital dose of Vitamin D. If you’re used to going to the gym or yoga classes for exercise, check out the thousands of online physical fitness classes that are now streaming, many for free. Limiting your alcohol intake and getting plenty of sleep will help boost your immune system and improve your mood. 

Limit Your Exposure to Media
It’s important to stay abreast of ever-changing health and safety guidelines but watching or reading too much news about the coronavirus can be upsetting and lead to anxiety or depression. Choose reputable, informative sources like the CDC website and your state and county health department websites if you want to read up on what’s going on with the virus, and try to limit your intake of sensationalist or negative coverage.

Keep in Touch
Social distancing has also caused many people to feel isolated and alone. Checking in with friends, family members and coworkers daily via text message, instant messaging or phone call can help you feel less lonely and keep your spirits up. Scheduling video chats is also a good way to keep and strengthen connections with the ones you love and gives you an opportunity for some face-to-face contact and hopefully, a few laughs. Weekly teletherapy sessions can also help you get negative feelings and thoughts off your chest and help you deal with what’s happening around you. 

Get Creative
Having a creative outlet can help take your mind off what’s going on in the world and give your brain a rest from thinking. If you love cooking, crafting, painting, or another hobby, now’s a great time to get into it. If you’ve always been interested in starting a new pastime, go for it! When you’re feeling fearful or worried, writing it all out in a journal can help ease anxiety as well. 

Reach Out If You Need Teletherapy

Whether you already have a mental health condition, or you just want to get a few things off your chest, don’t be afraid to reach out to a therapist. Kayenta Therapy offers both in-office and teletherapy services. Contact a therapist directly to get started.

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How Teletherapy Can Help You Cope with Grief During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Dealing with the loss of a loved one is a challenging, painful process. Grieving during the COVID-19 pandemic presents its own unique hurdles that can involve even more stress and uncertainty. There are many different ways to cope during these difficult times, including using tools like meditation, connecting with loved ones remotely and teletherapy.  Why Grieving […]

Contact a Kayenta Therapist Directly to Schedule Teletherapy

Dealing with the loss of a loved one is a challenging, painful process. Grieving during the COVID-19 pandemic presents its own unique hurdles that can involve even more stress and uncertainty. There are many different ways to cope during these difficult times, including using tools like meditation, connecting with loved ones remotely and teletherapy

Why Grieving in These Uncertain Times May Be More Difficult

When someone dies, family and friends typically come together to lend each other support, mourn the loss of their loved one and celebrate that person’s life. The need for social distancing during the pandemic has made this virtually impossible. Many people find healing in hugs and other forms of physical touch, which is also off limits right now. Those who have lost a loved one to the pandemic may not even have gotten the chance to say goodbye and being barred from holding a funeral or memorial service can interfere with the grieving and healing process. 

With less in-person support from friends and family, those who are grieving may feel more isolated and lonelier. Staying indoors has led to lower activity levels, which gives people more time to ruminate on their circumstances and feelings. Even if you’re still working, high levels of stress, constantly being reminded of illness and death, and uncertainty about the future can take a toll on your mental health. That’s why many people are turning to teletherapy to help them make it through.

Ways to Cope with Grief During the Pandemic

Although it’s not easy, there are things you can do to take care of yourself while grieving during these challenging times. 

Be compassionate with yourself. Suffering the loss of someone you love during this health crisis is tougher than it would be if everything was normal. Cutting yourself some slack and acknowledging that it’s more challenging can help you avoid falling into a hole of self-criticism. There are tons of outside sources of stress as well, so be gentle with yourself and remember that what’s happening is not anything you can control and that feeling sad or depressed is a natural part of the grieving process.

Stay connected. It’s tempting to detach when you’re feeling down, but the circumstances of the pandemic make it all too easy to become socially isolated. Make an effort to stay in touch by scheduling video chats with loved ones. Call or text with friends and family daily. Contacting your therapist and setting up a teletherapy session can also help you process your feelings and find coping skills that can help you through these difficult times.

 

Allow yourself to grieve, but practice self-care too. Of course, there’s nothing wrong with crying, looking at photos and talking about the person who has passed, but make sure to balance it with activities that restore and uplift you. Hobbies, exercise, meditation, reading, going for a walk, and enjoying time with pets can all be very healing and help you be more present. The 24/7 coverage of the pandemic can be a source of anxiety for many. Cutting down on the time you spend watching the news can also help you feel less sad or anxious. 

Contact a Therapist at Kayenta for Teletherapy

If you’re grieving the loss of a loved one and need help coping during the pandemic, Kayenta Therapy is here for you. Contact a therapist directly to schedule a teletherapy session today.

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